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Interventions with user involvement to promote self-efficacy or coping, for patients with long term health challenges

The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services has, in collaboration with the Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Learning and Mastery in Health (NK LMH), conducted a systematic literature search with subsequent sorting of possible relevant publications. The purpose was to find research on the effect of interventions with user involvement, aimed at promoting self-efficacy or coping, for people with long-term health challenges.

The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services has, in collaboration with the Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Learning and Mastery in Health (NK LMH), conducted a systematic literature search with subsequent sorting of possible relevant publications. The purpose was to find research on the effect of interventions with user involvement, aimed at promoting self-efficacy or coping, for people with long-term health challenges.


Key message

Method

We have conducted two systematic literature searches; one to identify systematic reviews, and one to identify Nordic primary studies. We searched in several research databases up to March 5th 2015. Two researchers have, independently, screened all titles and abstracts and extracted information from each relevant publication about the aim, population, intervention, outcomes, user involvement, method and the authors’ conclusions. We have not analysed or quality assessed the included systematic reviews or primary studies.

Results

Search for systematic reviews

  • Out of a total of 6900 references, we included 43 systematic reviews
  • The English term to describe what we here define as interventions to promote self-efficacy or coping, varies. In 21 of 43 systematic reviews the English term "self-management interventions / programs / education" is used
  • In all the systematic reviews at least one of the included primary studies have a form of user involvement as part of the intervention. The user involvement is described by the authors in 12 of the 43 systematic reviews
  • In 26 of 43 systematic reviews the authors conclude that interventions with user involvement to promote self-efficacy or coping have a positive effect, in 13 of 43 uncertain effect, and in two of 43 little or no effect
  • We have not analysed or quality assessed the included systematic reviews
  • We identified two relevant Nordic primary studies out of a total of 3479 references
  • One of the interventions with user involvement is a Norwegian patient education course for people with morbid obesity. The second is a Danish adaptation of the patient education program, "Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme" for people with chronic pain
  • The effects of the interventions were measured using different outcomes, and in both studies, the authors reported positive effects
  • We have not analysed or quality assessed the included primary studies

Search for Nordic primary studies

  • We identified two relevant Nordic primary studies out of a total of 3479 references
  • One of the interventions with user involvement is a Norwegian patient education course for people with morbid obesity. The second is a Danish adaptation of the patient education program, "Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme" for people with chronic pain
  • The effects of the interventions were measured using different outcomes, and in both studies, the authors reported positive effects
  • We have not analysed or quality assessed the included primary studies

About this publication

  • Year: 2015
  • By: Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services
  • Authors Fønhus MS, Stenberg U, Hafstad E.