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  • Topic identification, selection and prioritisation for health technology assessment (HTA)

Report

Topic identification, selection and prioritisationfor health technology assessment (HTA) - A report to support capacity building for HTA in low- and middle-income countries

Published

The aim of this project was to provide insight into the range of options for topic identification, selection and prioritisation (TISP) for health technology assessment (HTA) in low- and middle income countries (LMICs).

The aim of this project was to provide insight into the range of options for topic identification, selection and prioritisation (TISP) for health technology assessment (HTA) in low- and middle income countries (LMICs).


About this publication

  • Year: 2021
  • By: Norwegian Institute of Public Health
  • Authors Lauvrak V, Bidonde J, Peacocke E.
  • ISBN: 978-82-8406-245-7

Key message

This report is based on a systematic scoping review of TISP approaches, a country survey on TISP used in selected African, Asian, Latin America and Eastern European countries with a formalised HTA system, and feedback gathered during a webinar. This report aims to point to the range of TISP options, present examples and look critically at evidence, but makes no claims to be exhaustive. Rather, the results represent our understanding of how different approaches towards prioritising topics for HTA can be categorised by applying TISP. The results are intended to provide additional facts about TISP to supplement existing guidance on HTA implementation. Further work may include more detailed analysis of context-specific needs, comparisons of different approaches and structural limitations.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that:

  • As with the HTA process, it is important to ensure that TISP is transparent with regard to criteria, procedures and involvement of stakeholders.
  • The TISP approach should be carefully selected to acknowledge the relationship with the health system context (i.e. politics, needs, resources and values) to which it is applied.
  • For resourced limited settings, a simple TISP approach may be a starting point, but partnerships with more experienced countries, scientific networks and initiatives should be explored for solidification and comprehensiveness.