Hopp til innhold

Get alerts of updates about «Health risks associated with the use of electronic cigarettes: an interactive research map»

How often would you like to receive alerts from fhi.no? (This affects all your alerts)
Do you also want alerts about:

The email address you register will only be used to send you these alerts. You can cancel your alerts and delete your email address at any time by following the link in the alerts you receive.
Read more about the privacy policy for fhi.no

You have subscribed to alerts about:

  • Health risks associated with the use of electronic cigarettes: an interactive research map

Report

Health risks associated with the use of electronic cigarettes: an interactive research map

Published

The NIPH has systematically surveyed and created an interactive research map of existing literature on health risks associated with use of e-cigarettes.

20210901E-cig report_forside.jpg

The NIPH has systematically surveyed and created an interactive research map of existing literature on health risks associated with use of e-cigarettes.


Download

About this publication

  • Year: 2021
  • By: Folkehelseinstituttet
  • Authors Becher, R, Valen, H, Vist, GE [et al.].
  • ISBN (digital): 978-82-8406-236-5

Key message

We have systematically surveyed and created an interactive research map of existing literature on health risks associated with use of e-cigarettes. (Links to the research map are on page 31 in the raport). We included 1482 publications in the report. Since several of these may have reported to have more than one study design, such as both a publication with a human study and an animal experiment, the number of study designs included are in total 1760.

Respiratory, cardio-vascular as well as other adverse events (outcome not given under other code) were the health outcomes most often reported.

Very few human studies were published the first years after the introduction of e-cigarettes in 2007, but from 2013 there was an increase. Case reports and case series led the way, followed by cross-sectional studies. We identified 41 randomised controlled trials (RCT).

This study design is the most rigorous way of determining if a cause-effect relation exists between intervention (here use of e-cigarettes) and outcome. Only one of the RCTs had a follow-up time of six months or more. Among the other 105 studies with a control group, only six had a follow-up time of more than 2 years. Thus, any adverse impact of e-cigarette use on health which may take long time to develop, may remain undetected.

Overall, the interactive research map gives a visual presentation of the broad variety of health consequences linked to the use of e-cigarettes and may be used to identify potential human health risks and possible research gaps. Identification of the latter can be useful for the discussion of focus of future research.

The map shows what research is available, it does not assess the quality of the studies or size or severity of the health risk from using e-cigarettes.