Hopp til innhold

Mapping review

Information of research gaps from NOKC systematic reviews and HTA-reports in 2013

  • Year: 2014
  • By: Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services
  • Authors Vist GE, Jamtvedt G.
  • ISBN (digital): 978-82-8121-913-7

A yearly report of the knowledge gaps that we identify during our work with the systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTA) that we conduct.


Order

Download:

Key message

The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services publish yearly a report of the knowledge gaps that we identify during our work with the systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTA) that we conduct.  The identified gaps do not cover the needs for research in Norway, but reflects the needs that were identified for the questions that was prioritized for our systematic reviews and HTA reports for 2013.

Most of our systematic reviews and HTA’s conducted in 2013 concluded that there is a further need for more research. This includes public health, screening, diagnostics, drugs, mental health, trauma and surgery, kidney failure, heart failure, organization of care, various welfare interventions. 

Some reports found a complete lack of studies of effect that addressed the relevant question. There is a lack of effect studies assessing:

  • The accuracy of asking two questions as a method of screening for depression
  • The effect of aspirin for cancer prevention
  • Use of single room compared to specially designed isolation rooms for preventing infections
  • Task shifting between health care personnel in hospitals

-some tasks in connection with surgery

-some tasks between radiologists and radiographers

-some tasks between pathologists and pathology assistants

-new tasks for medical secretaries

 

Generally, there is also a need for studies to include a more complete description of participants, interventions and comparisons. It is a need that those who are compared in studies is relevant/similar to the relevant populations/patients, that the interventions are given in relevant intensity/dose, that the important outcomes are measured, and that the interventions are followed for an appropriate length of time.