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Project

The Epilepsy in Young Children (EPYC) Study - project description

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The goal is to identify and clinically characterize children with epilepsy within the MoBa cohort and to subsequently study the causes of epilepsy.


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Summary

In most cases of childhood epilepsy, the onset is before five years of age. This is particularly the case for the more serious types of epilepsy. Despite this fact there is a lack of knowledge about prevalence, risk factors and clinical development of epilepsy in children. Most previous studies are performed in a specialist setting where participants more seriously affected are overrepresented. The prevalence of cognitive and behavioural problems in children with epilepsy is poorly documented, and it is currently unknown whether such problems are caused by epileptic activity. This lack of

knowledge reduces the quality of interventions for children with epilepsy, especially with regard to needs that are not directly related to the epileptic seizures. This project is based on the Norwegian mother and child cohort study (MoBa). MoBa is a population based cohort that includes 114 500 children and their parents. The overall goal is to identify and clincally characterize children with epilepsy within the MoBa cohort, and subsequently use clinical data and questionnaire data and biological material from MoBa to study causes of epilepsy.

See the full project description at Cristin for more information about results, researchers, contact information etc.

Project participants

Project leader

Pål Surén, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Project participants

Pål Suren, Avdeling for barns helse og utvikling, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Heidi Aase, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Inger Johanne Bakken, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Gro Dehli Villanger, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Richard Chin, The University of Edinburgh
Kari Modalsli Aaberg, Norwegian Institute of Public Health