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Tobacco use among adults (Indicator 10)

Published


The indicator describes the following: Proportion of adults who use tobacco.


This indicator is part of Target (5): 30 per cent reduction in tobacco use.

The indicator covers current daily or non-daily use of tobacco. Tobacco use mainly consists in smoking and the use of snus. We present data on the proportion of adults who smoke and the proportion who use snus or smoke.

Results

From 1985 until 2016, smoking (daily or non-daily) fell from just under 50 per cent to around 20 per cent among men, and from around 40 per cent to 20 per cent among women, in the 18-74 age group. Towards the end of the period, the proportion who smoked was similar for both genders. 

The decline in smoking coincides with a rise in the use of snus among both genders. The rise in the regular use of snus plateaued during the period between 2010 and 2015. The increased use of snus compensated for the decrease in smoking among men during the period between 2005 and 2015. Among adult women, the use of snus is less widespread and thus there was a stable net reduction in the total proportion reporting that they smoked or used snus. 

If we focus on the period between 2010 and 2015, we see a decline in the annual proportion of both genders who used snus or smoked on a regular basis; among men, from 42 per cent in 2010 to 37 per cent in 2015, and among women, from 31 per cent in 2010 to 25 per cent in 2015. 

tobacco men NCD.jpg

Figure 1: Proportion who smoke or use snus daily or non-daily among men aged 18-74, in five-year age groups, as a percentage, age-standardised. Source: Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits, Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See Table 1 below.

tobacco women NCD.jpg

Figure 2Proportion who smoke or use snus daily or non-daily among women aged 18-74, in five-year age groups, as a percentage, age-standardised. Source: Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits, Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See Table 2 below. 

Data source: Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits  

The data source for this indicator is the Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits.

A description and definitions follow below.

Description 

The Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits is a telephone-based, nationwide survey of tobacco use (questions about smoking and snus) among individuals aged 16-79, undertaken by Statistics Norway on behalf of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The survey has been conducted annually since 1973 and the response rate has been around 60 per cent in recent years, around 70 per cent in the 1990s and around 90 per cent in the 1970s. Since 1985, questions about snus have also been asked. 

From 1973 until 1991 the survey was conducted as a supplementary part of the Labour Force Survey. During this period, around 2500 people participated annually. From 1992 until 2016, the survey formed part of Statistics Norway’s Omnibus Survey and Travel Survey. During this period, 2000 people were invited to participate each quarter, with the exception of the second and last quarter of 2015 and 2016 when 3000 people were invited. The survey was not conducted from the first quarter to the third quarter of 1992, in the first and third quarter of 1994, the third quarter of 1998 and the second quarter of 2000. 

Numerator

  • The proportion of adults in the 18-74 age range who responded that they smoke and/or use snus on a daily or non-daily basis, stated as a percentage, in five-year age groups, age-standardised.

Years are stated in five-year age groups (1973-1977…2013-2016). These numbers form the basis for the figures and tables. 

  • The proportion of adults in the 18-74 age range who responded that they smoke and/or use snus on a daily or non-daily basis, stated as a percentage, in one-year age groups, age-standardised.

These figures are described in the Results. 

In calculating the figures, changes in the age distribution of the population over time are taken into account in that the figures are standardised to the age distribution of the population of Norway as at 1 January 2012. 

Interpretation and sources of error

Combining daily use and non-daily use entails different consequences for different groups. For men, non-daily smoking and non-daily snus use have remained relatively stable over time. For women, non-daily use of snus is increasing. The result is that the use of snus is increasing more over time, when we compare regular use with daily use.

Data quality

The data quality is deemed to be good, although the response rate has declined over time. In recent years, Statistics Norway has calculated weightings to adjust for deviations from the sample. The use of weightings in the generation of tables has very little effect on the results. However, the sample size will be too small to provide useful responses to questions requiring the sample to be broken down into smaller parts, for example one-year age groups or counties. 

Tables accompanying the figures

Year

Smoke

Use snus

Smoke or use snus

1985

51

7

53

1990

48

6

50

1995

46

8

48

2000

42

11

44

2005

36

16

38

2010

30

19

42

2015*

23

21

37

* Figures for 2017 are not currently available

Table 1Proportion who smoke or use snus daily or non-daily among men aged 18-74, in five-year age groups, as a percentage, age-standardised. Source: Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits, Norwegian Institute of Public Health. 

Year

Smoke

Use snus

Smoke or use snus

1985

42

0

42

1990

42

0

43

1995

43

1

44

2000

41

1

41

2005

35

2

35

2010

28

5

31

2015*

20

8

25

* Figures for 2017 are not currently available

Table 2: Proportion who smoke or use snus daily or non-daily among women aged 18-74, in five-year age groups, as a percentage, age-standardised. Source: Norwegian Survey of Smoking Habits, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Global indicator definition

Indicator 10. Age-standardised prevalence of current tobacco use among persons aged 18+ years.

Authors and contacts

Text compiled by the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Drugs and the Department of Non-Communicable Diseases at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.