Hopp til innhold
Close

Get alerts of updates about «CeFH lunch seminar: Rannveig Kaldager Hart "Extended paternity leave, mothers' and fathers' earnings, and union stability"»

How often would you like to receive alerts from fhi.no? (This affects all your alerts)
Do you also want alerts about:

The email address you register will only be used to send you these alerts. You can cancel and delete your email address at any time by following the link in the alerts you receive.
Read more about the privacy policy for fhi.no

You have subscribed to alerts about:

  • CeFH lunch seminar: Rannveig Kaldager Hart "Extended paternity leave, mothers' and fathers' earnings, and union stability"

Oops, something went wrong...

... contact nettredaksjon@fhi.no.

... reload the page and try again-

Event

CeFH lunch seminar: Rannveig Kaldager Hart "Extended paternity leave, mothers' and fathers' earnings, and union stability"

Presentation by Rannveig Kaldager Hart, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Presentation by Rannveig Kaldager Hart, Norwegian Institute of Public Health


7. Dec | 2018

11:00-12:00
Seminar
Marcus Thranes gate 2, meeting room 2nd floor

About the speaker

Rannveig Kaldager Hart is researcher at the Department for Health and Inequality at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. She works on topics on families, health and inequality and is interested in causal identification and policy evaluation.

About the presentation

Long paternity leaves have the potential to leave lasting effects on parental unions, potentially reducing specialization and increasing union stability. We put these hypotheses to a causal test, using an extension of the Norwegian parental leave father's quota from 6 to 10 weeks as a source of exogenous variation in fathers' leave uptake. We implement a Regression Discontinuity design, using full population data from Norwegian administrative registers of parents of children in a four-month window around the reform (N = 9 516). The reform significantly increased the amount of leave taken by fathers by about three weeks and reduced the amount of leave taken by mothers by about four weeks. Neither union stability nor his or her earnings were affected by the reform. The null finding suggests that extended paternity quotas do not equalize or stabilize unions –nor do they intensify fatherhood wage penalties.

The paper is joint work with Synøve Andersen and Nina Drange from Statistics Norway, Research Department.