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Project

Reproduction, partner disruption and health - project description

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The main aim of the project is to understand the health consequences of changes in fertility patterns and partner disruption.


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Summary

In the last few decades we have witnessed marked fertility and family changes in rich countries. These include increasing age at childbearing, a lower number of children born to each woman or man, greater use of assisted reproductive technology, higher frequency of family disruptions, and increasingly complex family structures.

The main aim of the project is to understand the health consequences of changes in fertility patterns and partner disruption. The health consequences are studied on the population level, with special focus on mortality and morbidity from cancer, cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders.

The goal of the Centre for Fertility and Health is to advance the understanding of the health implications of these changes for the involved adults and children. Much is already known about health effects of reproductive behaviour and family transitions - which involve both biological and social mechanisms – but we hope to add important pieces to this knowledge through creative and methodologically advanced use of the Norwegian registers.

These are the research questions we will answer in our four sub-projects:

  • How do maternal/paternal age at birth, number of siblings, and age interval between siblings affect children’s health?
  • How do the number of children (including childlessness), age at first birth, and interval between births affect adult health?
  • How does disruption of parental relationships, and possible parental re-partnering, affect children’s health?
  • How does disruption of relationships, and possible re-partnering, affect the health of the involved adults?

In this project we make use of the rich data from Norwegian registers and health surveys. The whole Norwegian population is included. The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics has approved the project.

The data will be stored at the Service for Sensitive Data (TSD), a service provided by the University of Oslo. The Service for Sensitive Data is a platform to collect, store, analyse and share sensitive data in compliance with Norwegian data protection regulations to protect the individual’s privacy. No information or biological samples are made available to researchers before names and personal identity numbers (fødselsnummer) are removed.

The data sources are:

Registries:

  • National Registry
  • Norwegian Cause of Death Registry
  • Censuses
  • Education Database (Statistics Norway)
  • Income/wealth data from the Norwegian Tax Administration
  • State Register of Employers and Employees (NAV)
  • FD-Trygd database
  • Cancer Register of Norway
  • Norwegian Prescription Database
  • Medical Birth Registry
  • Norwegian Patient Registry
  • KUHR database
  • Norwegian Armed Forces Health Registry (including conscription data)
  • Norwegian Twin Registry
  • Historical Population Register

Cohorts and surveys:

  • The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa)
  • Cohort of Norway (CONOR)
  • Fertility surveys (Future and Family Survey 2003 and the Norwegian Generations and Gender
  • Survey 2007)
See the full project description at Cristin for more information about results, researchers, contact information etc.

Project participants

Project leader

Per Magnus, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Project participants

Siri Eldevik Håberg, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Kåre Bævre, Avdeling for helse og ulikhet, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Per Magnus, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Øystein Kravdal, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Håkon Gjessing, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Inger Johanne Bakken, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Astanand Jugessur, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Olaug Margrete Askeland, Avdeling for helseregistre, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Maria Christine Magnus, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Jennifer Ruth Harris, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Wendy Sigle-Rushton, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Emily Grundy, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Jonas Minet Kinge, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Vegard Fykse Skirbekk, Senter for fruktbarhet og helse, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Øystein Aalstad Jonasson, Avdeling for helseregistre, Norwegian Institute of Public Health