Hopp til innhold

Selected items added to basket

Go to basket

Project

NON-PROTECTED. The impact of perfluorinated toxicants and the gut microbiome on vaccine responses in children. - project description

Published Updated


The project will investigate whether PFAS, even at lower levels, is of importance for the vaccine response, as well as investigating the role of the gut microbiota for vaccine responses.


Have you found an error?

Summary

Vaccination programs are one of the greatest successes of medicine, but may now be threatened due to the effects of environmental toxicants on the immune system. A study from the Faroe Islands showed that exposure to the environmental toxicants perfluoralkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), substances found in Gortex, Teflon, water repellent paper and more, were related to children’s antibody response to vaccines. Children exposed to the highest levels of toxicants had a risk that the response was so poor that the vaccines would not provide full protection.

Other factors in modern life, such as Caesarean section and antibiotics, are of concern as it changes the composition of the gut microbiota and reduces diversity. An early encounter with certain bacteria is considered crucial for a well-functioning immune system.

The main purpose of this research project is to investigate whether PFAS, even at lower levels, is of importance for the vaccine response, as well as investigating the role of the gut microbiota for vaccine responses.

See the full project description at Cristin for more information about results, researchers, contact information etc.

Project participants

Project leader

Merete Åse Eggesbø, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Project participants

Hein Stigum, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Johanna Eva Bodin, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Gro Tunheim, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Cathrine Thomsen, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Audun Aase, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Berit B Granum, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Line Småstuen Haug, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Merete Åse Eggesbø, Avdeling for miljøeksponering og -epidemiologi, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Nina Louise Torcelino-Iszatt, Avdeling for miljøeksponering og -epidemiologi, Norwegian Institute of Public Health