You are here: home > studies > mother and child cohort study

Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

illustration colourbox.com

The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is a unique study where more than 90,000 pregnant women were recruited between 1999 and 2008. Some of the mothers have more than one child in MoBa and the last child was born in 2009. Over 70,000 fathers have also participated. We will hold contact with these families in the years to come, collecting further data through questionnaires.

Regional Ethics Committee approval required for access to MoBa data

Regional Ethics Committee approval required for access to MoBa data

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health is changing the practice for accessing data files from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). This means that all researchers who want to access data from MoBa must submit a project specific approval from the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics (REC-approval) before questionnaire data can be released.
Read more [10.06.2015]
Successful InterPregGen Colloborators Meeting in Oslo

Successful InterPregGen Colloborators Meeting in Oslo

27 InterPregGen delegates from Europe and Central Asia met in Oslo in April to try to get closer to an answer to the mystery of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women.
Read more [21.05.2015]
Antidepressant use in pregnancy associated with anxiety symptoms in 3-year-olds

2015 research finding

Antidepressant use in pregnancy associated with anxiety symptoms in 3-year-olds

Three-year-old siblings exposed to antidepressants in pregnancy show increased anxiety symptoms compared to their unexposed siblings.

Read more [15.04.2015]
Link between toddler sleep patterns and behaviour at 5

2015 research finding

Link between toddler sleep patterns and behaviour at 5

Toddlers who sleep less than 10 hours a night or wake frequently are more likely to have emotional and behavioural problems at the age of five, according to a study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Read more [15.04.2015]
High quality centre-based childcare can prevent developmental difficulties

2015 report

High quality centre-based childcare can prevent developmental difficulties

High quality centre-based childcare appears to prevent the development of language and behavioural difficulties over time, particularly among vulnerable children. The factors that appear to affect children include space for learning activities, staff education, relationships with staff, activities offered, time spent in childcare and group size.
Read more [19.02.2015]
MoBa film with English subtitles

MoBa film with English subtitles

A short film about the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study has been released, with English subtitles. It is intended to give a brief description of the study to participants, researchers, potential partners and other stakeholders.
Read more [26.01.2015]
Organic vegetables may reduce risk of pre-eclampsia

2014 research finding

Organic vegetables may reduce risk of pre-eclampsia

Pregnant women who often eat organic vegetables have a lower risk of pre-eclampsia than women who rarely or never do. This is shown in a 2014 article using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) published in the British Medical Journal Open.
Read more [15.09.2014]
Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

2014 research finding

Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

In the past, researchers believed that most cases of cerebral palsy (CP) were caused by birth-related injury, but a new study shows that some of the cause may be due to hereditary factors.

Read more [01.09.2014]
Pre-pregnancy risk drinking predicts toddler behaviour problems

2014 research finding

Pre-pregnancy risk drinking predicts toddler behaviour problems

Risk drinking before pregnancy can increase the risk of the development behavioural problems in toddlers. This comes from a 2014 study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Early intervention to help and support mothers and their children could help to prevent these problems from developing into long term behavioural problems.
Read more [01.08.2014]
Parental obesity and autism risk in the child

2014 research finding

Parental obesity and autism risk in the child

Several studies have looked at possible links between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the risk of developmental disorders in the child. However, paternal obesity could be a greater risk factor than maternal obesity, according to a 2014 study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Read more [07.04.2014]