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Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

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The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is a unique study where more than 90,000 pregnant women were recruited between 1999 and 2008. Some of the mothers have more than one child in MoBa and the last child was born in 2009. Over 70,000 fathers have also participated. We will hold contact with these families in the years to come, collecting further data through questionnaires.

Pre-pregnancy risk drinking predicts toddler behaviour problems

Pre-pregnancy risk drinking predicts toddler behaviour problems

Risk drinking before pregnancy can increase the risk of the development behavioural problems in toddlers. This comes from a new study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Early intervention to help and support mothers and their children could help to prevent these problems from developing into long term behavioural problems.
Read more [01.08.2014]
Parental obesity and autism risk in the child

Parental obesity and autism risk in the child

Several studies have looked at possible links between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the risk of developmental disorders in the child. However, paternal obesity could be a greater risk factor than maternal obesity, according to a new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Read more [07.04.2014]
Good adult contact in childcare important for mental and language development

Good adult contact in childcare important for mental and language development

A new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health examines how variation in quality of Norwegian centre-based childcare is related to mental and linguistic functioning in children. The results show that children with good relationships to the adult caregivers in centre-based childcare also have better language and psychological development than those children with poor caregiver relationships.
Read more [24.03.2014]
A healthy dietary pattern may lower the risk of preterm delivery

A healthy dietary pattern may lower the risk of preterm delivery

Vegetables and fruit, fish and whole grains are important for mother and child. But pregnant women also eat sausages, white bread and potato crisps. Researchers from Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health have good news for pregnant women: “Our research shows that a diet with lots of vegetables, fruit, whole grain cereals and fish may lower the risk of preterm delivery, even though pregnant women also eat less healthy food”, says senior researcher Anne Lise Brantsæter.
Read more [05.03.2014]
Gender and genes play an important role in delayed language development

Gender and genes play an important role in delayed language development

Boys are at greater risk for delayed language development than girls, according to a new study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The researchers also found that reading and writing difficulties in the family gave an increased risk.
Read more [17.02.2014]
New study on neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal exposure to paracetamol

New study on neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal exposure to paracetamol

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is the most commonly used medicine in pregnancy, yet there are very few studies that have investigated the possible long-term consequences for the child. A new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health suggests that long-term use of paracetamol during pregnancy may increase the risk of adverse effects on child development.
Read more [28.10.2013]
Environmental contaminants may reduce immunity

Environmental contaminants may reduce immunity

Exposure to environmental contaminants during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of infections during the first three years of life and a reduced response to childhood vaccines. This is found in two studies from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health from 2013 and 2012.
Read more [18.03.2013]
Caffeine is linked to low birth weight

Caffeine is linked to low birth weight

Caffeine intake in pregnancy is linked to lower birth weight but not to preterm delivery, according to findings from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Caffeine from coffee, but not from other sources, is associated with slightly longer pregnancies.
Read more [19.02.2013]
Lower autism risk with folic acid supplements in pregnancy

Lower autism risk with folic acid supplements in pregnancy

Women who took folic acid supplements in early pregnancy almost halved the risk of having a child with autism. Beginning to take folic acid supplements later in pregnancy did not reduce the risk. This is shown in new findings from the ABC Study and Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study published in the Journal of The American Medical Association (JAMA).
Read more [15.02.2013]
Centre-based child care: Long hours do not cause aggression and disobedience

Centre-based child care: Long hours do not cause aggression and disobedience

Spending many hours in centre-based child care does not lead to more aggression and disobedience in children, according to a new study using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Read more [28.01.2013]