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Does traffic noise increase the risk of obesity?

Does traffic noise increase the risk of obesity?

There is an association between road traffic noise and the risk of obesity among people who are particularly sensitive to noise, according to a study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
[27.02.2015]
Vitamin D supplements: not recommended to prevent chronic diseases

Vitamin D supplements: not recommended to prevent chronic diseases

Vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for a variety of chronic diseases, which has led to increased use of vitamin D supplements, often in high doses. However, taking a supplement "just in case" is not recommended to prevent chronic diseases until reliable knowledge about the efficacy or unwanted effects are available. This is the conclusion from a knowledge summary published in the British Medical Journal.
[26.02.2015]
High quality centre-based childcare can prevent developmental difficulties

2015 report

High quality centre-based childcare can prevent developmental difficulties

High quality centre-based childcare appears to prevent the development of language and behavioural difficulties over time, particularly among vulnerable children. The factors that appear to affect children include space for learning activities, staff education, relationships with staff, activities offered, time spent in childcare and group size.
[19.02.2015]
Amoeba infection: Use sterile or boiled water for nasal washing abroad

Amoeba infection: Use sterile or boiled water for nasal washing abroad

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has been informed that a woman from Oslo died in December 2014 after returning from Thailand where she had been infected with the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The source of infection appears to be daily nasal washing with tap water. If you are unsure about the water quality, always use sterile or boiled water for nasal washing, particularly in subtropical and tropical areas.

[27.01.2015]
Immunotherapy inhibits heroin effects in research animals

Immunotherapy inhibits heroin effects in research animals

Immunotherapy could have a place in the treatment of substance abuse in the future. A specific antibody can reduce the acute effects of heroin, according to a new experimental study at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
[20.01.2015]
Snus use in Norway has tripled in five years

2014 report

Snus use in Norway has tripled in five years

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
[19.11.2014]
Making a global action plan for antibiotics

Making a global action plan for antibiotics

Every year, 25,000 people die as a result of antimicrobial resistance in Europe. A global action plan for one of the greatest health threats of our time was the aim of a conference held in Oslo on 13th-14th November 2014. Representatives from 40 countries attended the conference arranged by Norway together with six other countries and the World Health Organization (WHO).
[11.11.2014]
Global health security on the White House agenda

Global health security on the White House agenda

At least 60 million Norwegian kroner will be allocated to help establish public health institutes and to implement international health regulations in low-to-middle income countries, announced Bent Høie, Norwegian Minister of Health in Washington DC.
[06.10.2014]
Organic vegetables may reduce risk of pre-eclampsia

2014 research finding

Organic vegetables may reduce risk of pre-eclampsia

Pregnant women who often eat organic vegetables have a lower risk of pre-eclampsia than women who rarely or never do. This is shown in a 2014 article using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) published in the British Medical Journal Open.
[15.09.2014]
Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

2014 research findings

Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

In the past, researchers believed that most cases of cerebral palsy (CP) were caused by birth-related injury, but a new study shows that some of the cause may be due to hereditary factors.

[01.09.2014]